Pasadena City College, Home of the PCC Lancers

Proposition 30 Frequently Asked Questions

The passage of Proposition 30 (Tax Increase for Education) in California's general election will restore an estimated $6.7 million in funding to the Pasadena City College budget to fund classes, resources, and college success programs for PCC students.

Proposition 30 passed by a decisive majority of 54 percent, illustrating that Californian's see the value in higher education and the mission of community colleges.

"The Pasadena Area Community College District Board of Trustees, PCC's administration, faculty, staff, and students all join me to express gratitude to the voters of California for their support of education and PCC," said PCC Superintendent/President Dr. Mark Rocha. "I thank everyone who joined the campaign and worked to the final moment. I especially want to thank Student Trustee Hanna Israel, PCC Associated Students President Simon Fraser and all the Associated Students for their hard work on this campaign that helped lead to this successful result."

PCC was forced toreduce more than 570 class sections this academic year due to the continuedbudget cuts from Sacramento.

"It will take some time to learn the details of this state funding, but today it is safe to say that the passage of Proposition 30 will enable us to plan to add classes to the spring semester that begins on January 7, 2013, and certainly to offer even more classes in the summer 2013 term," said Bob Miller, PCC assistant superintendent of Business and College Services.

General

What does the passage of Prop 30 mean to PCC?

PCC will receive $6.7 million in restored funding, meaning PCC will be given back the funds that were scheduled to be cut by the state. Students will receive more access to resources and class sections beginning in spring 2013.

When will PCC receive its share of Prop 30 funds?

Funds are expected from the state in June of 2013. 

Will winter intersession be restored? Why or why not?

Classes will be in session on January 7, 2013 as part of the spring term. State data shows that PCC's student success outcomes have declined, especially among basic skills students, our most at-risk students for not completing. This data also shows that students in basic skills English, ESL and math usually complete at higher rates when instruction occurs consistently over an academic year without a long winter break.

Do these funds increase PCC's budget overall?

Proposition 30 restores funds that were cut by the state. It essentially gives back the $6.7 million that PCC was reduced at the beginning of the 2012-2013 fiscal year.  

Will there be more classes in spring and summer terms?

Yes. The funds will be used to restore class sections that were reduced due to state budget cuts. Spring term, which begins January 7, 2013, will be augmented with additional class sections. I more robust summer term 2013 will also be offered to students.

Can the Prop 30 funds be used for administrator salaries?

No. A provision of Proposition 30 dictates that these funds cannot be used for administrator salaries. In addition, a report is required to be posted online on how the district spends these funds.

What classes will be restored? How will this be determined?

Class sections that help students the most will be added to the spring and summer terms. PCC will look to build out the First Year Pathways experience and add sections that lead to degrees, certificates, and transfer. PCC will help students who need one to three classes to transfer to a four-year university. 

Can class fees go up even with Prop 30 passing?

The state legislature controls community college fees and has the power to increase the amount students’ pay per unit. There is no plan by the state at the moment to increase fees from the $46 per unit for California residents. 

Will PCC restore the resources, hourly staff, and vacant positions left unfiled after retirements now that Proposition 30 has passed?

PCC has endured a number of reductions due to state cuts. With the passage of Proposition 30, the college and district will consider restoring resources and positions that increase student success, support the Educational Master Plan, and the Board of Trustee and District goals. 

Can class fees go up even with Prop 30 passing?

The state legislature controls community college fees and has the power to increase the amount students’ pay per unit. There is no plan by the state at the moment to increase fees from the $46 per unit for California residents.