Area: Sport Management

Sub-Area:

    For in-depth information see What Can I Do With This Major, Sport Management
  • Administration of Amateur Athletics
    • Olympic
    • Intercollegiate
    • High School
    • Youth
  • Administration of Professional Teams and Leagues
    • Player Personnel
    • Business Operations
  • Public Relations
  • Sales
  • Marketing and Promotions
  • Ticketing and Seat Management
  • Facilities Management
  • Event Coordination
  • Program Coordination
  • Fund Raising
  • Sponsorship Sales
  • Sport Information
  • Athlete Representation

Employers:

  • Professional teams and leagues, e.g. NFL, MLB
  • Professional athletes
  • Professional player associations and unions
  • Sport associations, e.g. PGA Tour
  • Conference offices, e.g. SEC, ACC
  • Governing bodies
  • Colleges and universities
  • Arenas
  • Auditoriums
  • Stadiums
  • Golf courses
  • Tracks
  • High schools
  • Youth sport programs
  • Sport related franchises
  • Training centers
  • Sport camps
  • Health and fitness clubs
  • Recreational facilities
  • Local sport and tourism corporations
  • Sport marketing firms
  • Sport management firms

Strategies & Information:

  • Major in sport management or sport administration. Earn a master's degree for increased opportunities.
  • Develop outstanding communication skills, written and oral.
  • Take courses in marketing, public relations, and advertising. Hone public speaking skills.
  • For player representation, pursue a degree in law to aid in negotiating contracts and financial planning.
  • Obtain accounting or business skills and experience. Develop a background in sales.
  • Volunteer to coordinate athletic programs and events such as marathons, golf tournaments, or special olympics for campus organizations or local non-profit groups.
  • Get involved with campus sport teams, intramurals, or recreational programs.
  • Build a network of contacts with sport administrators, student athletes, and merchandise representatives.
  • Join sport-oriented associations and organizations.
  • Obtain an internship or part-time job with a team, an athletic organization, or a sport facility.
  • Be willing to work in any capacity with minor league or local teams as a way to enter the field and gain experience.

Area: Sporting Goods / Sport Merchandising

Sub-Area:

  • Product Development
  • Product Distribution
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Brand/Product Representation
  • Store Management
  • Internet Sales

Employers:

  • Sport equipment and supply industry, e.g. Wilson, Spalding, Adidas
  • Exercise equipment manufacturers
  • Sport and recreation retailers
  • Online sport retailers
  • Sporting Goods Manufacturer's Association

Strategies & Information:

  • Work in retail stores that sell sport or recreational merchandise or in campus recreation facilities that rent equipment to students.
  • Gain sales experience through part-time or summer jobs and internships.
  • Volunteer as a team equipment manager.
  • Make contact with college equipment or uniform representatives.
  • Develop strong communication skills and learn how to build interpersonal relationships.

Area: Sport Media

Sub-Area:

  • Journalism
  • Broadcasting
  • Photojournalism
  • Sport Information
  • Advertising Sales

Employers:

  • Newspapers
  • Television stations
  • Radio stations
  • Magazines
  • Special interest sport publications
  • Sport-related internet sites

Strategies & Information:

  • Major in journalism, broadcasting, electronic media, photography, or English.
  • Supplement program with courses in sport management or physical education.
  • Obtain an internship or part-time job with local or university newspaper or radio/television station.
  • Publish, as much as possible, in college and local newspapers.
  • Create a portfolio of published work, both articles and photographs, or an online portfolio highlighting digital media skills.
  • Develop excellent public speaking and writing skills and a solid command of sports.

Area: Exercise Science

Sub-Area:

    For in-depth information, see What Can I Do With This Major, Exercise Science
  • Research
  • Teaching
  • Assessment and Evaluation
  • Program Development
  • Athletic Training
  • Personal Training
  • Rehabilitation
  • Strength and Conditioning
  • Health Club Management
  • Group Fitness Instruction
  • Sport Medicine
  • Physical Therapy

Employers:

  • Colleges and universities
  • Public and private schools
  • Sport medicine centers
  • Hospitals and rehabilitation clinics
  • Health clubs and fitness centers
  • Professional teams
  • Corporate health centers
  • Professional fitness organizations such as:
    • American College of Sports Medicine
    • National Strength and Conditioning Association
  • Olympic training centers
  • Competitive youth training centers
  • Nutritional supplement manufacturers

Strategies & Information:

  • Major in exercise science, exercise physiology, kinesiology, or sport medicine.
  • Supplement curriculum with nutrition and hard science courses.
  • Consider professional or graduate school in physical therapy, athletic training, or medicine.
  • Obtain necessary certification such as Certified Group Fitness Instructor, Certified Personal Trainer, or National Athletic Trainer Certification.
    • Other certifications can be granted by the American College of Sports Medicine or the National Strength and Conditioning Association.
  • Develop computer skills and familiarity with technology used in the field.
  • Work in a physical therapy clinic, health club, or gym to gain experience and make contacts.
  • Volunteer to work with college or high school sport teams or to run exercise programs for local, non-profit organizations.
  • Consider working with manufacturers of exercise equipment or nutritional supplements to learn more about the field and to make contacts.
  • Develop excellent interpersonal skills for working with clients, coaches, and team physicians.
  • Maintain excellent personal fitness and athletic proficiency.

Area: Physical Education

Sub-Area:

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Adaptive Physical Education
  • Recreational Sport Administration

Employers:

  • Public and private schools, K-12
  • Colleges and universities

Strategies & Information:

  • Obtain a degree in education, physical education, or other sport related field in addition to appropriate state teacher licensure. Earn dual certification for increased job opportunities.
  • Become familiar with a variety of physical, cognitive, and affective disabilities if interested in an adaptive physical education career. Supplement coursework with special education classes.
  • Secure a part-time position with a youth recreation center, college athletic facility, or intramural athletic administration department.
  • Develop competitive and instructive proficiency in a wide array of sports.
  • Obtain a graduate degree to teach at the college level or to advance into administrative positions. Secure a graduate assistantship teaching physical education courses.

Area: Coaching

Sub-Area:

  • Professional
  • College
  • High School
  • Private
  • Youth Sport

Employers:

  • Professional sport teams
  • Colleges and universities
  • High schools and middle schools
  • Recreational organizations or leagues, e.g. YMCA
  • Country clubs
  • Racket clubs
  • Gyms
  • Tracks
  • Ice rinks
  • Golf and tennis resorts
  • City parks and recreation departments
  • Youth sport organizations, e.g. Little League Baseball
  • Sport related franchises
  • Sport camps

Strategies & Information:

  • Major in exercise science, sport management, or physical education, although coaches can hold nearly any academic background.
  • Obtain teacher licensure in an academic subject for high school or middle school coaching positions.
  • Gain extensive, advanced playing experience.
  • Research coaching certifications in various sports.
  • Develop additional knowledge in areas of strength training, fitness, nutrition, and conditioning.
  • Learn about and practice motivational techniques.
  • Become familiar with legal and regulatory issues related to coaching, e.g. NCAA regulations.
  • Volunteer to coach neighborhood, church, and community teams.
  • Attend practices of teams at various levels to observe coaches' techniques.
  • Serve as a referee or umpire.
  • Seek a graduate assistant position in athletic administration, instruction, or coaching.
  • Obtain an assistant and then head coaching position at the university level to increase possibility of progressing to the professional level.

Area: Officiating

Sub-Area:

  • Refereeing
  • Umpiring
  • Line Judging

Employers:

  • Professional sport leagues
  • College and university athletic associations
  • Amateur athletic associations, e.g. United States Tennis Association
  • High school athletic associations
  • Recreational leagues

Strategies & Information:

  • Volunteer to umpire youth or Little League games.
  • Work as a referee for campus intramurals.
  • Be prepared to maintain full-time employment in addition to refereeing while you get started. It takes time to build a career in refereeing.
  • Join sport associations and organizations to stay current on developments in the field and to make contacts. Attend classes, seminars, camps, and workshops sponsored by these organizations.
  • Obtain certification to officiate in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) games.
  • Attend an umpire training school or camp for professional opportunities.
  • Obtain the required ten years of collegiate football refereeing experience before applying to The National Football League (NFL).
  • Earn the Professional Football Referees Association licensure or other applicable credential.

Area: Sport Psychology

Sub-Area:

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Consultation
  • Performance Enhancement

Employers:

  • Colleges and universities
  • Olympic training centers
  • Competitive youth sport centers
  • Recreation organizations and leagues
  • Professional sport teams
  • Professional and competitive athletes
  • Hospitals

Strategies & Information:

  • Major in psychology, physical education, exercise science, or other physical activity related field.
  • Obtain a doctoral degree in sport psychology, sport sociology, or clinical/counseling psychology and complete postdoctoral training if you desire to work with professional sport teams or athletes.
  • Develop good relationships with coaches and other athletic department personnel. Express a willingness to learn from coaches and athletes.
  • Gain experience in a variety of different sports.
  • Assist faculty with research.
  • Develop strong written and oral communication skills.
  • Consider coaching youth teams.
  • Develop social perceptiveness and active listening skills to use when working with athletes.
  • Join professional associations such as the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 47 (Sport and Exercise Psychology) or the Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology (AAASP).

Area: Exercise and Health Psychology

Sub-Area:

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Health Promotion
  • Primary Care
  • Inpatient Medical
  • Specialized Health Care

Employers:

  • Colleges and universities
  • Hospitals
  • Health clubs and fitness centers
  • Olympic training centers
  • Rehabilitation clinics
  • Public health agencies

Strategies & Information:

  • Major in one of the social sciences and supplement coursework with hard science classes.
  • Acquire training in the areas of research, grant-writing, and statistics.
  • Volunteer in a hospital or fitness center.
  • Develop strong written and oral communication skills.
  • Learn to work well in a team environment.
  • Earn a graduate degree in clinical, counseling, social, or experimental psychology for health psychology opportunities.
  • Earn a graduate degree in sport psychology, with an exercise emphasis, for a career in exercise psychology.
  • Pursue a postdoctoral internship or fellowship for advanced career opportunities.

General Information and Strategies