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Course Catalog
2012/2013
Section 1 - Admissions And Registration

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SECTION I

 

ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION

 

MATRICULATION

Matriculation is a process to help each student in achieving his/her educational goal. The matriculation process includes services throughout the entire educational experience including:

•   Admission

•   Orientation to College

•   Assessment tests to identify which English, math and science courses to select for registration

•   Advising to interpret test scores; review transcripts to clear pre-requisites

•   Counseling to assist with developing an educational plan and selecting courses

•   Academic Probation Counseling

•   Early Alert to help students who are not progressing successfully through courses

Matriculation is a partnership between the student and the College to work together until goal completion. Students take responsibility for goals which means identifying educational goals and participating in these services. Some students are exempt from certain components of the process, but all students are encouraged to participate.

 

Who Participates in Matriculation?

Depending on your background and educational goals, you may be exempt from some parts of the matriculation process. The following will help you decide which parts of matriculation apply to you.

 

Admission

All students must file an application with the College. No one is exempt.

 

Orientation

Orientation is a valuable experience. You are exempt from orientation if any of the following describes you:

1. Already have an associate or higher degree from a regionally accredited educational institution.

2. Are currently enrolled at a four-year college or university.

3. Are currently enrolled in the 12th grade or below AND will enroll in nine or fewer units at PCC.

4. Have an educational goal of “educational development/personal development/interest” AND will enroll in six or fewer units.

5. Were in attendance within the past two
semesters.

 

Orientation

Orientation familiarizes students with important College policies and expectations, as well as the range of services and programs available. An on-line orientation is now available on the Web. at: www.pasadena.edu. Click on Apply and Register.

 

Assessment Services

Assessment Services administers a variety of tests, inventories, surveys, and other assessment instruments to provide current information about student achievement, abilities, and skills. Placement testing is offered in the areas of Chemistry, English, English as a Second Language (ESL) and Mathematics.  Services also include competency testing in English and Mathematics for the A.A. and A.S. degrees.  Assessment services are available for admitted and currently enrolled students and for applicants specifically referred for assessment.  Pasadena City College placement exam results are valid for two years.

 

Importance of Placement Exam:  Taking a placement exam is very important because it will assist students and their Counselor in identifying the appropriate level of Chemistry, English, ESL and Math courses they should enroll in at PCC.  Students should review BEFORE taking a placement exam so they can become familiar with the exam format an on what to expect on the exam.  Review materials are available on the Assessment Center website:  http://www.pasadena.edu/studentservices/assessment/.

 

Consequences of Not Taking Placement Exam Seriously

•   Students may be placed in a course that is either too easy or too difficult for them.

•   Students may spend more time taking courses that do not count toward a degree.

•   Students may spend additional money to take these courses.

 

Items to Bring For Assessment

New and Returning Students

1. A valid photo ID (driver’s license, State ID, high school ID, passport, etc.).

    Please note:  no photocopies of identification will be accepted.

2. Current Permit to Register (issued once a student is admitted to PCC).

 

Continuing Students

PCC Lancer Card ID.

 

Policies

Course Enrollment Policy

The placement exams are designed for initial placement in a course sequence for Chemistry, English, ESL and Math courses. Once a student is enrolled in the course, the professor’s evaluation and grade will determine whether or not a student advances to the next level. Students may not retest to challenge or skip a course in a sequence.

 

Retest Policy

Students must wait a minimum of eight weeks to retake the placement exam.  Exams may be retaken once in a one-year period.

 

 

Assessment and Counseling

If you are in good standing, are not enrolled in pre-collegiate basic skills courses, are not seeking admission to a selective program, and meet either one of the following criteria, you are exempt from both the counseling, advisement and assessment components:

1. Have a bachelor’s or higher degree from a regionally accredited educational institution; or

2. Have an educational goal of “educational development/personal development/interest” AND enroll in courses with no prerequisites AND enroll in 6 units or fewer.

 

Testing

Placement testing may be waived if you have a recent (taken within one year) comparable or equivalent test score which the College accepts. 

 

Optional Initial Placement in Courses

Although placement exams are offered, students seeking initial placement in a sequence of courses are strongly advised to participate in the assessment process, in which a counselor will help evaluate skills, experience, aptitudes, and motivation. Based on information such as the student’s goals, high school grades, test scores, work experience, and other measures, the counselor will recommend placement at the level which meets the student’s needs and in which he or she has a reasonable chance of success.

 

Matriculation Rights

Prerequisite/Corequisite Enrollment Limitation Challenge Process

A student may file the “Pasadena City College Prerequisite/Corequisite/Enrollment Limitation Challenge,” with supporting documentation, if he or she believes one or more of the following:

1. The student has the knowledge or ability to succeed in the course or program despite not meeting the prerequisite or corequisite.

2. The student will be subject to undue delay in attaining his/her educational goal because of the enrollment limitation or because the prerequisite or corequisite course has not been made reasonably available.

3. The prerequisite, corequisite, or limitation on enrollment has not been established in accordance with applicable PCC policies and procedures.

4. The prerequisite or corequisite is in violation of Title 5, Sections 55200-55202 of the California Code of Regulations.

5. The prerequisite, corequisite, or enrollment limitation is either unlawfully discriminatory or is being applied in an unlawfully discriminatory manner.

 

Challenge forms are available in the Counseling Office (room L104) or the Advising Center (L103D). The student bears the initial burden of showing that grounds exist for the challenge. The challenge will be resolved in a timely manner, and if it is upheld, the student will be permitted to enroll in the course or program in question, provided that space was available at the time the challenge was filed. It is to the student’s advantage to file the form as soon as he or she becomes aware of the alleged grounds for the challenge. The student should review the challenge form itself for more detailed information and required procedures.

 

A link to the Prerequisite Challenge Form can be found at: http://www.pasadena.edu/admissions/registration/procedures/index.cfm. Please bring the form to Advising, L103D, or fax it to (626) 585-7187 with the appropriate documentation. Forms received without documentation will be denied.

 

ADMISSIONS

Application for Admission

Individuals who wish to enroll in Pasadena City College for credit in day or evening classes must submit an application for admission and any required official documents with complete and accurate information to the Admissions and Records Office. Some curricula have special admissions procedures and deadlines. Application forms may be obtained in the Admissions and Records Office. Applications may also be completed and submitted online, through the PCC website. A re-entering student with a lapse of enrollment in a Fall or Spring semester must submit a new application. Students who withdrew from the College prior to the third week of the previous semester must also submit a new application.

Once submitted, the application and any submitted supporting documents become the permanent property of the College and will not be returned to the applicant. Applicants who do not provide accurate information will not be considered for admission nor allowed to remain in attendance if discrepancies are discovered after enrollment. Deliberate falsification of information is a basis for disciplinary action or dismissal from the College.

Processing of applications for the Summer intersession and Fall semester begins April 1 each year, and on October 1 for the following Winter intersession and Spring semester. Registration for classes is based on a priority system; for new and re-entering students, registration times are assigned based in part upon the admission date. It is advantageous to apply early.

 

Program of Study

Following clearance of admission requirements, students are advised about the availability of College orientations, financial aid, assessment services and counseling, all of which will assist them in planning their complete programs while at the College.

 

Deadlines for Submitting Applications

The last date to apply for admission to the College and have all required documents on file is the Friday immediately prior to the opening date of the College term.

 

Nongraduates of High School

Nongraduates of high school who are 18 years of age or older may be admitted to Pasadena City College if it appears that they can profit from instruction at the college level. However, it is recommended that students who have not had a semester lapse in high school attendance contact the Community Education Center regarding alternatives to completing their high school graduation requirements. Students who completed the California High School Proficiency Examination with satisfactory scores will be admitted to Pasadena City College.

 

Accredited High School Graduates

Graduates of accredited high schools are eligible for admission to Pasadena City College. Many courses have prerequisites, or academic preparation that are strongly recommended. Certain two-year curricula have special admission requirements. See Curriculum section.

 

Concurrent Enrollment Students

Qualified students who have not yet graduated from high school may be admitted for concurrent enrollment at Pasadena City College in advanced scholastic or vocational courses based on the approval of the school principal (parental approval required if under 18). Such students must have availed themselves of all alternate sources for obtaining the desired instruction within the student’s school district, have the approval of the parent(s) and the Associate Dean of Admissions and Records, and meet special admission criteria. Such students are limited to 9 units during the Fall or Spring semester and 6 units during the Winter or Summer session.

 

English as a Second Language (ESL)

Students

A placement test is strongly recommended if English is not the native language of the student. Based on the results of this test and other measures, Counseling Services helps the student choose courses in which he or she will be most likely to succeed.

 

Open Enrollment Policy

It is the policy of Pasadena City College that, unless specifically exempted by statute, every course supported by state funds shall be open for enrollment to any person who has been admitted to the College, except that students may be required to meet prerequisites established pursuant to Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations (Sections 55200-55202).

Each class is allowed a maximum number of students which is based on the special nature of the course and/or physical limitations of the facilities. Whenever pre-enrollment in such a class reaches this number, the class is designated as “closed.” Admission to the College does not guarantee space in any class.

Many, not all, classes have Wait Lists. Students may choose to be placed on a Wait List when registering for the term.  If a space in a closed class opens prior to the start of the class, the first student on the Wait List will be contacted by email and given an Add Code.  The student must add/register for the class promptly.  As space becomes available, Wait List students are contacted in numerical order based on their placement on the list. Students remaining on the Wait List must attend the first class meeting to find out if space becomes available.  If so, students obtain a Late Add Code from the instructor and add/register for the course prior to the late add deadline.

 

Counseling Room L104, (626) 585-7251     

Students have access to the counselor of their choice. Each counselor is well-informed in fields such as art, business, engineering, liberal arts, life sciences, mathematics, music, physical education, physical sciences, social sciences, technology and Career & Education. Counselors can advise students regarding educational plans, career goals and personal problems. They interpret tests and analyze interests, abilities, failures and successes. Although counselors assist in long-range planning and in checking specific requirements, the responsibility for meeting graduation requirements, course prerequisites or requirements for transfer to other colleges or universities is one which must be assumed by each student. In the counseling offices, as well as the College Library and the Transfer Center, students have access to a reference library of catalogs from various colleges and universities.

 

REGISTRATION

With the exception of concurrent enrollment students, all students receive an appointment to register. Students register by using the online LancerPoint Services. For information concerning the registration process, consult the current semester schedule of classes which is available online at www.pasadena.edu.

 

Changes in the Student’s Schedule

(Adding or Dropping Classes)

Students should exercise great care when planning their semester schedules. If a schedule change is unavoidable, required procedures must be completed before the change becomes official.

Classes may be added to the student’s schedule, subject to available class space, by following required procedures. A class drop is defined as an action which removes a student’s name from enrollment in a specific class. The following sections concerning voluntary class drops and drops for absence apply to regular semester-length Fall or Spring semester classes. Deadlines are different for short-term or intersession classes. Specific deadline dates are available in the semester Schedule of Classes and on PCC’s website.

A drop from a 16-week class is not recorded on the student’s Permanent Record if the effective date is within the first two weeks of the semester. A “W” entry is recorded from the third week through the 11th week when such a class is dropped. Short-term courses will have different dates.

The final date to drop a regular semester-length class, whether initiated by student or instructor, is Friday of the 11th week of the semester. Short-term and intersession classes will have different dates.
Refer to the calendar at the beginning of this Catalog or in the semester Schedule of Classes for specific deadlines.

 

Class Drops Upon Faculty Recommendation

Drops – Absence

Students considered as “no-shows” will be dropped during the census period of classes. Students must make arrangements with instructors prior to any planned absences from class. Census for semester-length courses is the time frame before the third Monday of the semester for 16 week courses. Census periods for short-term courses vary.  Students may be dropped from a semester-length class for continuous or cumulative absences which total the number of hours the class is scheduled to meet in a two-week period. For short-term courses students may be dropped after missing 11% of the total class hours. Three tardies may be considered the equivalent of one absence.

 

Drops for Other Causes

a. Drop for Unsafe Performance – A student whose classroom, clinical, or laboratory actions are dangerous to the health or welfare of the student or other persons may be dropped from the class.

b. Drop for Unsatisfactory Conduct or Citizenship – A student may be dropped from class for unsatisfactory conduct or citizenship related to the class. This includes, but is not limited to, conduct in a classroom or other setting such as a laboratory, clinic, or work station. Unsatisfactory conduct or citizenship includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, other forms of academic dishonesty, flagrant violation of instructor direction, and actions disruptive to the on-going teaching and learning process.

A student subject to class drops for condition(s) noted in (a) or (b) above will be counseled by the instructor and the division dean and given a chance to improve, except when the violation is so flagrant that immediate suspension from class is in order.

If a student is counseled for improvement but there is insufficient improvement in the judgment of the instructor and the division dean, or if immediate suspension appears to be in order, a signed class drop form and a written report on the incident will be submitted to the Vice President of Student and Learning Services. The Vice President of Student and Learning Services will obtain and review information available and take action deemed appropriate. The Vice President of Student and Learning Services will inform the student of due process rights if the class drop or other discipline is imposed.

 

Withdrawal from College

Students who need to withdraw from the College (drop all courses in a given session) must go to the Registration Office to obtain specific information on the procedure. Withdrawals according to the regulations of the College and clearance of all obligations will provide the student with a withdrawal in good standing. This clearance includes payment of funds owed to the College such as library fines and breakage fees, locker key return.

The final date for completely withdrawing from the College is Friday of the 12th week of the Fall or Spring semester for semester-length classes. Short-term and intersession classes have proportionate deadlines.  A grade of W is recorded for all courses in which the student is enrolled at the time of withdrawal.

 

Continuous Enrollment

For purposes of admissions and registration, students maintain continuous enrollment by being enrolled in a minimum of one class on the census day for the class for both Fall and Spring semesters. Such students will receive priority registration over new and re-entering students.

For purposes of meeting IGETC or CSU General Education Certification, continuous enrollment is defined as attending PCC at least one semester during each academic year without missing two consecutive semesters.

 

Change of Address

Any changes in contact information must be reported immediately. Update contact information online through PCC’s website. Students may also go to the Records Office (L113).

 

Study Load Regulations

Maximum Load

Full-time students are expected to carry 15 units per semester for normal progress. Those who would like to take more than 19.3 units per semester may apply to the Petitions Committee through a counselor. Ordinarily, such petitions will not be considered unless the student’s cumulative GPA is 2.0 or above.

Students on probation are limited to 12 units during the Fall and Spring semesters. Such students should speak with a counselor frequently regarding progress and further program limitations.

Concurrently enrolled high school students are limited to 9 units during Fall or Spring semesters and 6 for Winter or Summer sessions.

Maximum credit in field practice or similar courses is 16 units with no more than one course enrollment per semester.

 

The maximum load for a six-week intersession is 8.3 units.

Each unit of community college work is approximately three hours of recitation, study or laboratory work per week in a semester-length course. All students are expected to devote the full time indicated above for each unit of work. Students employed part time are advised to limit their college program accordingly. It is recommended that the total of college and work hours not exceed 60 hours per week.

The following is a suggested guideline:

 

College Academic             Hours of Employment

        Load                                    per Week

      15 Units                                 15 Hours

      12 Units                                 24 Hours

        9 Units                                 33 Hours

        6 Units                                 40 Hours

 

Minimum Load

The college does not specify a minimum load except when the student desires to meet certain requirements such as those below.

1. Certification that a student is attending full time. Requirement: 12 or more units in a Fall or Spring semester.

2. Full-time load to maintain status as an F-1 visa (international) student. Requirement: 12 or more units per Fall or Spring semester.

3. Eligibility to participate in California Community College intercollegiate athletics. Requirement: Be enrolled in 12 or more units during the season of competition, complete 24 units between each season of competition in that sport and maintain an overall grade-point average of 2.00. Contact the Director of Kinesiology, Health and Athletic Division or the Assistant Dean, Student Affairs, for additional California Community College and/or conference requirements.

4. Eligibility to participate in student government as an office holder. Requirement: Be enrolled in 9 or more units in the Fall or Spring semester of participation, and have an overall 2.00 grade-point average.

5. The load requirements for Chapter 30, 31, 32, 33, 1606, and 1607 (Veterans), and for Chapter 35 (Dependents) is given below.

 

Semester

Full-time                              12 or more units

Three-fourths time                      9 -11.8 units

One-half time                             6 - 8.8 units

Less than one-half time               4 - 5.8 units

One-fourth time                          1 - 3.5 units

 

Summer/Winter Intersession Load

To determine the equivalent semester unit load for certification purposes during the Summer and Winter intersessions, multiply the number of Summer or Winter units for each course taken by 16 and divide by the number of weeks the class meets. Add the calculated equivalent units. This result may be compared to the units required during a Fall or Spring semester to determine the equivalent Winter or Summer load.

 

Student Classification:

Freshman, first semester: fewer than 15 units of college credit.

Freshman, second semester: at least 15 units of college credit and fewer than 30.

Sophomore, first semester: at least 30 units of college credit and fewer than 45.

Sophomore, second semester: 45 to 60 units of college credit.

 

Minimum Scholastic Requirements

Scholastic standards at Pasadena City College have been maintained at a consistently high level since establishment of the institution. While all students are expected to maintain the highest scholastic standard of which they are capable, the College interprets an average grade of C as acceptable scholarship.

 

PREREQUISITES, COREQUISITES,
LIMITATIONS ON REGISTRATION
AND ADVISORIES

PLAN AHEAD! All prerequisites, corequisites, and limitations on enrollment stated in the course descriptions listed in this Catalog will be strictly enforced at the time of registration. Students who do not meet the prerequisite requirements according to College records will not be permitted to register for the course. Students who believe they have met the prerequisite at another institution are strongly advised to have all transcripts of prior college work evaluated and on file well in advance of registration to minimize registration delays.

Note:  Unofficial transcripts are accepted for prerequisite clearance.

 

Initial Placement in Courses      

Students seeking initial placement in a sequence of courses are strongly advised to participate in the assessment process, in which a counselor will help evaluate skills, experience, aptitudes, and motivation. Based on information such as the student’s goals, high school grades, test scores, work experience, and other measures, the counselor will recommend placement at the level which meets the student’s needs and in which he or she has a reasonable chance of success.

 

Prerequisites/Corequisites/Recommended

Preparation             

A “prerequisite” is a condition of enrollment, such as successful completion of another course (with a grade of A, B, C, or P), that must be met BEFORE a student can register for a course or an educational program. Successful completion of a prerequisite demonstrates readiness for the subsequent course or program. By meeting the prerequisite, the student shows that he or she knows certain skills, concepts, and/or information without which the college considers success in the subsequent course or program highly unlikely.

A “corequisite” is a course in which a student is required to enroll at the same time that he or she is enrolled in another course. In the corequisite course, the student acquires certain skills, concepts, and/or information without which the College considers success in the concurrent course highly unlikely.

A “recommended preparation” statement in a course description means that a student is advised, but not required, to complete the identified course(s) prior to enrollment in another course or educational program. The skills, concepts, and/or information gained in the “recommended preparation” in another course or educational program will prepare students for success in the subsequent course or program.

All prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended preparation statements listed in the course descriptions are periodically reviewed. Students – especially those new to Pasadena City College – should consult the Schedule of Classes and Counseling Services for the most current information. Students are expected to meet valid and necessary course prerequisites and corequisites.

 

Prerequisite/Corequisite Enrollment

Limitation Challenge Process

A student may file the “Pasadena City College Prerequisite/Corequisite/Enrollment Limitation Challenge,” with supporting documentation, if he or she believes one or more of the following:

1. The student has the knowledge or ability to succeed in the course or program despite not meeting the prerequisite or corequisite.

2. The student will be subject to undue delay in attaining his/her educational goal because of the enrollment limitation or because the prerequisite or corequisite course has not been made reasonably available.

3. The prerequisite, corequisite, or limitation on enrollment has not been established in accordance with applicable PCC policies and procedures.

4. The prerequisite or corequisite is in violation of Title 5, Sections 55200-55202 of the California Code of Regulations.

5. The prerequisite, corequisite, or enrollment limitation is either unlawfully discriminatory or is being applied in an unlawfully discriminatory manner.

   Challenge forms are available in the Counseling Office (room L104) or the Advising Center (L103D).  The student bears the initial burden of showing that grounds exist for the challenge. The challenge will be resolved in a timely manner, and if it is upheld, the student will be permitted to enroll in the course or program in question, provided that space was available at the time the challenge was filed. It is to the student’s advantage to file the form as soon as he or she becomes aware of the alleged grounds for the challenge. The student should review the challenge form itself for more detailed information and required procedures.

   A link to the Prerequisite Challenge Form can be found at:

http://www.pasadena.edu/admissions/registration/procedures/index.cfm. Submit the completed form to Advising, L103D, or fax it to (626) 585-7187 with the appropriate documentation. Forms received without documentation will be denied.

 

RESIDENCE DETERMINATION

A student who does not qualify as a resident according to the policies and procedures described herein, must pay nonresident tuition at the rate per unit in effect for the term the student plans to attend. It is the student’s responsibility to read and adhere to the following rules and procedures for residence determination as set forth in the applicable laws and regulations.

A student seeking reclassification from nonresident to resident status must complete a Supplemental Residency Questionnaire (available in the Admissions Office, L113) and attach legible copies of documents in support of the claim for resident status. The questionnaire and all supporting documentation must be submitted in the office of the associate dean of admissions and records (room L113) as early as possible to avoid delays in processing, but no later than 4 p.m. Friday before the applicable residence determination date. (The residence determination date for a given semester or intersession is the last Saturday before the semester or intersession opening date.) Additional information may be required during the residency review. The burden of proof is on the student to prove that California residence has been established.

Students classified incorrectly as residents or incorrectly granted an exception from nonresident tuition are subject to reclassification as nonresidents and payment of nonresident tuition in arrears. Applications for a change in classification with respect to a previous term are not accepted.

After a final decision on residency classification is made, a student may appeal in writing to the Associate Dean of Admissions and Records (room L113) within 30 days.

 

General Summary of Residency Rules

Students are cautioned that the following statement of the rules regarding residence determination is not a complete discussion of the law, but a summary of the principal rules and their exceptions.  Students should also note that changes may have been made in policies, statutes and regulations between the time this information is published and the applicable residence determination date. For the text of relevant laws and regulations, refer to the California Education Code Civil Code Section 25.1 and to California Code of Regulations, Title 5.

The State of California requires the following before a student may be classified a resident for tuition purposes: (1) evidence of one year’s physical presence in California prior to the residence determination date; (2) evidence (in the words of the state, “objective manifestations”) of one year’s intent to make California the home for other than a temporary purpose (the “permanent residence’’) prior to the residence determination date; and (3) for any student seeking reclassification from nonresident to resident status, evidence of financial independence from any nonresident of California.

A student classified as a nonresident cannot be reclassified as a resident merely because he or she has maintained continuous attendance for one year at a California institution while paying nonresident tuition. The student must meet all three criteria of presence, intent and financial independence.

For an adult student (e.g., a student 18 years of age or older) the evidence produced in support of the claim for California residence must apply directly to the student. That is, the name of the student must appear on the documents submitted. Documentation pertaining to parents, other relatives, or friends is not sufficient. If the student’s residence is legally derived from (and thus is the same as) that of another person (see below), the evidence produced must apply to that other person.

 

Spouses

A person’s residence is not derived from that of his or her spouse; each person must establish residence separately.

 

Minors

The residence of a minor is determined in accordance with the following:

1. The residence of the natural or legally adoptive parent with whom an unmarried minor lives is the residence of that minor, regardless of the length of time the minor has resided with that parent. This rule applies equally to the minor child of permanently separated parents.

2. A married minor may establish his or her own residence. A minor who was married but thereafter divorced, retains the capacity to establish his or her own residence. A minor whose marriage has been annulled must be treated as an unmarried minor since for all intents and purposes a marriage has not occurred.

3. If the minor lives alone, he or she takes the residence status of the parent with whom he or she last lived.

4. If both parents are deceased and there is no court-appointed guardian, the minor may establish residence as though he or she were an adult.

5. The residence of an unmarried minor who has a parent living cannot be changed by the minor’s own act, by the appointment of a legal guardian, or by relinquishment of a parent’s right of control.

6. A student who has been an adult for less than a full year (e.g., one under 19 years of age) may under certain circumstances combine the immediate pre-majority derived California residence with the immediate post-majority California residence to satisfy the one year necessary for resident classification.

 

Meeting the Criteria of Presence and Intent

The burden is on the student to demonstrate clearly both physical presence in California and intent to establish permanent California residence. Presence and intent may be manifested in many ways - no one factor is controlling - but all those ways fall into two main categories.

1. An individual who is 19 years of age or over, and who can provide sufficient evidence that he or she has maintained a home in California continuously for the two years prior to the residence determination date, and has not been a student during the two years, is presumed to have met the presence and intent criteria, unless the individual has taken any action inconsistent with the claim of intent as described below.

    An individual who is under 19 years of age is presumed to have met the presence and intent criteria if both the individual and his or her parents can show that they have resided in California continuously for the two years prior to the residence determination date, unless the student has taken any action inconsistent with the claim of intent as described below.

    Evidence of two continuous years residence of a home in California can take the same form as evidence of presence and intent as described below. However, the documents presented must show continuity over the two-year period.

2. Students who are not in the “two-year” category described above must present evidence of one year’s presence and intent. A list of acceptable items is available in the Admissions and Records Office. Some examples of such items include: California state income tax form, voter registration, driver’s license, or automobile registration; active resident membership in a California professional, service, or social organization; and utility deposit or installation receipts. The more of these items  presented, and the higher their relative weight, the stronger the case for classification as a California resident becomes. All documents presented must be valid, readable, dated at least one year before the residence determination date, and properly identified with respect to student name and address.

    Actions inconsistent with a claim of intent to remain a permanent California resident will be counted against that claim. Such actions include, but are not limited to, doing the following in a state other than California: registering to vote, entering into a legal agreement, attending an educational institution as a resident of the other state or maintaining a driver’s license or automobile registration in another state.

    In some cases, financial independence may also be considered in the evaluation of intent as indicated below.

 

Meeting the Criterion of Financial

Independence

In addition to meeting the presence and intent criteria as outlined above, the student seeking reclassification from nonresident to resident status must show financial independence from any nonresident of California according to guidelines set forth by the State of California. In order to establish financial independence, a student seeking reclassification must show the extent to which he or she has met the following criteria for the current and each of the immediately preceding three calendar years:

1. That the student has not been claimed as an exemption for state and federal tax purposes by his or her nonresident parents;

2. That the student has not received more than $750 from his or her nonresident parents; and

3. That the student has not lived in the home of his or her nonresident parents for more than six weeks in any given year.

Inability to prove all the financial independence criteria for the entire period will not necessarily result in classification as a nonresident if the showing of one year’s presence and intent is sufficiently strong. However, a student who is unable to satisfy all three financial independence criteria for the current and immediately preceding calendar years will be classified as a nonresident, since financial independence is of greater significance for those years. Financial independence for the second and third calendar years immediately preceding the year in which reclassification is requested will be considered together with all other relevant factors in determining intent, with no special weight attached to the financial independence factor.

Evidence of financial independence may be presented in the form of (1) affidavits signed by student and parent indicating the extent to which the three criteria listed above have been met, and (2) copies of the federal and state income tax returns filed by student and/or parent for the current and any applicable preceding calendar years.

 

Exceptions

There are several exceptions to the laws regarding residency. If it appears that any of these exceptions might be applicable, the student should discuss the matter with the Associate Dean of Admissions and Records or designee. In any case where an exception is claimed, proper documentation of the basis for that claim must be presented. Some of the exceptions follow:

A. A minor student remaining in California, whose parent has established residence outside California within one year prior to the residence determination date and had legal California residence for at least one year before leaving, is entitled to resident classification until the student has attained the age of majority and has resided in the state the minimum time necessary to become a resident, so long as, once enrolled, the student maintains continuous attendance at an institution.

B. A student under 19 years of age on the residence determination date who has been entirely self-supporting for more than one year immediately preceding that date and who can meet the regular adult presence and intent criteria outlined above is entitled to resident classification until the student has resided in the state the minimum time necessary to become a regular adult resident.

C. A minor student is entitled to resident classification if, immediately prior to enrolling at an institution, the student has lived with and has been under the continuous direct care and control of any adult or adults, other than a parent, for a period of not less than two years, provided that the adult or adults having such control have had legal California residence during the year immediately prior to the residence determination date. This exception continues until the student has resided in the state the minimum time necessary to become a resident, so long as continuous attendance is maintained at an institution.

D. A student who is an adult alien is entitled to resident classification if the student has been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence in accordance with all applicable laws of the United States, provided that the student has met all the legal requirements for California residence for more than one year after such admission and prior to the residence determination date. In other words, the one-year period for showing presence and intent cannot begin until the date lawful admission for permanent residence is established. (Holders of valid A, E, G, H-1, H-4, I, K, L, O-1, R or V visas should contact the Associate Dean of Admissions and Records or his or her designee regarding their residence status.)

E. A student who is a minor alien is entitled to resident classification if both the student and his or her parent have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence in accordance with all applicable laws of the United States, provided that the parent has met all the legal requirements for California residence for more than one year after such admission and prior to the residence determination date. (Holders of valid A, E, G, H-1, H-4, I, K, L, O-1, R and V visas see note under “D” above.)

F. A student who was admitted to the United States as a refugee, asylee or parolee and produces proper documentation of that status and who produces appropriate evidence of having met the presence and intent criteria described above may be entitled to resident classification.

G. A student who is a full-time employee of a California public institution of higher learning or whose parent or spouse is such a full-time employee may at the option of the institution which the student proposes to attend be entitled to resident classification until the student has resided in the state the minimum time necessary to become a resident.

H. A student who left California due to a job transfer made at the request of the employer of the student or the employer of the student’s spouse, or in the case of a student who resided with and was a dependent of his or her parent, made at the request of the parent’s employer; who was absent from California for less than four years; and who would qualify as a resident if the period of absence was disregarded may be entitled to resident classification.

I.  Other exceptions pertain to certain members of the armed forces and their dependents, apprentices (as defined in Labor Code Section 3074-3077), certain agricultural laborers, and certain employees of California public schools. More detailed information about these categories is available in the Admissions and Records Office. Students seeking additional information concerning residence requirements for tuition purposes should contact the Admissions Office, room L113, or the Associate Dean of Admissions and Records or designee.

 

California Nonresident Tuition Exemption (AB 540)

Any student, other than a nonimmigrant alien, who meets all of the following requirements, shall be exempt from paying nonresident tuition at the California Community Colleges, the California State University and the University of California (all public colleges and universities in California):

1. The student must have attended a high school (public or private) in California for three or more years.

2. The student must have graduated from a California high school or attained the equivalent prior to the start of the term (for example, passing the GED or California High School Proficiency exam).

3. An alien student who is without lawful immigration status must file an affidavit with the college or university stating that he or she has filed an application to legalize his or her immigration status, or will file an application as soon as he or she is eligible to do so.

Students who are nonimmigrants (for example, those who hold valid F [student] visas, B [visitor] visas, J [exchange visitor visas], etc.) are not eligible for this exemption.

The student must file an exemption request including a signed affidavit with the college that indicates the student has met all applicable conditions described above.  Student information obtained in this process is strictly confidential unless disclosure is required under law.

Students eligible for this exemption who are transferring to another California public college or university must submit a new request (and documentation if required) to each college under consideration. 

For procedures on requesting the exemption from nonresident tuition at Pasadena City College, please contact the Admissions and Records Office or go online to PCC’s website and click on “Steps to Register.”

 

Residence Categories

Applicants for admission are divided into the following categories:

1. Applicants whose legal residence is in the Pasadena Area Community College District. This consists of the following school districts: Arcadia, a portion of El Monte, San Gabriel, La Cañada Flintridge, Pasadena, Rosemead, San Marino, South Pasadena and Temple City.

2. Applicants whose legal residence is in California but not within the area of a California community college.

3. Applicants whose legal residence is within another California community college district.

4. Applicants who do not qualify as legal California residents for tuition purposes and are determined to have nonresident status. Such applicants will be required to pay nonresident tuition fees.

 

International Students – (F-1 Visa Status Students)

The policy of the Board of Trustees of the Pasadena Area Community College District is that provision of an adequate program for international students on campus makes a significant contribution to the education of students at the college and the promotion of international understanding in the community and throughout the world.

Under federal law of the United States, Pasadena City College is authorized to enroll non-immigrant alien students on F-1 student visas for the first two years of an accredited Baccalaureate Degree program. Admission is subject to the requirements stated below and to the approval of the Assistant Director, International Student Office. An international student interested in applying should write to the International Student Office for application materials, or access the college website  (www.pasadena.edu/internationalstudents).

All transcripts (submitted in English translation if the original is in another language), English language test results and other required documents must be on file in the International Student Admissions Office by the deadline dates (please see the ISO website for deadline dates).

All F-1 visa students are subject to nonresident tuition as set by the PCC Board of Trustees. Current tuition rates may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records, the Office of the Vice President of Student and Learning Services, or the College website (www.pasadena.edu). F-1 visa student must carry illness and accident insurance purchased through Pasadena City College.

A. Admissions Requirements for Admission in F-1 Visa Status

1. General – All Applicants

a. An applicant must have English language ability adequate to enable the student to profit from instruction at the college level. An international student is not admitted solely for special training in English. Adequacy of English proficiency is determined by a satisfactory score on the Test of  English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), administered worldwide by the Educational Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, New Jersey 08540; if the test is not available in the applicant’s area, results of a standardized test administered at a U.S. consulate may be substituted. PCC also accepts the STEP Test, Level 2, and International English Language Testing System (IELTS) 4.0 minimum score.

b. An applicant must offer evidence of academic achievement equivalent to an American high school education.

c. An applicant must present evidence of financial resources to cover costs during the period of attendance at the college. Estimated costs include: nonresident tuition fee of $4,560 (24 units); enrollment and other fees, $1,492; health and accident insurance, $876; living expenses, $10,000; textbooks and supplies, estimated at $572, for a total of about $16,500 per year. Students should anticipate increases each year. Fees are due at registration. The above figures do not include the Summer or Winter intersession.

2. Limitations and Exceptions

a. An international student attending by another collegiate institution in the United States must obtain a SEVIS Record release from the other collegiate institution before acceptance to Pasadena City College.

b. An applicant for admission in F-1 visa status who has completed college or university work in excess of that usually offered at a community college level in the United States (first two years of a four-year collegiate program) will be considered overly qualified and not eligible for admission to Pasadena City College. Such students should apply at institutions more appropriate to their needs.

B. Additional Information

1. Orientation

    An on-campus international student orientation is provided both in the Fall and Spring semesters.   

2. Employment

    An international student must attend the College full time; a permit to work on campus is issued only if there is urgent financial need. For off-campus employment, approval of the United States of Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is required.

3. Housing

    International students must arrange for their own housing.

4. Maximum Period of Enrollment

    An international student is expected to complete a program in the most expeditious manner possible, generally in four to six semesters.

5. Regulations

    An international student should become familiar with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services regulations as well as College regulations on student conduct and enrollment and comply with those regulations. A student who drops below full-time enrollment or fails to maintain normal progress towards his/her goal is subject to dismissal from the College. The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services will be notified in such cases.

 

International Students – Other Than 

F-1 Visa

Some alien students with visas other than F-1 may be eligible for admission subject to approval of the Associate Dean of Admissions and Records. If admitted, such students will be subject to nonresident tuition and may be limited in their enrollment. Individuals holding F-2, B1/B/2 visas are not admitted to PCC and are advised that they will be in violation of their visa status by attending school. Questions related to this should be directed to the International Student Office.

 

COSTS OF ATTENDING THE COLLEGE

The fees and tuition costs are subject to change by State law or at the discretion of the College. The information listed below was correct at the time of Catalog publication, January 2011.

 

Fees

State law prescribes payment of the following enrollment fee each semester or session:

Enrollment Fee.....$46 per unit

 

Students classified as California residents pay only the enrollment fee, a mandatory health fee of $13.00 per semester, a $10.00 student activity fee and a $1.00 per semester student representation fee. During the Summer and Winter intersessions the health fee is $10.00 and the student activity fee is $5.00. Students who are not California residents pay these fees as well as nonresident tuition. Certain students may qualify for an exemption on the basis of verified religious reasons or enrollment in apprentice programs.

 

Nonresident Tuition

Students who are nonresidents of California for tuition purposes (see page 28) are required to pay a fee as established each year by the Pasadena Area Community College District Board of Trustees. Beginning in Fall 2010, all non-residents and non-citizens will be required to pay out-of-state tuition of $202 per unit and $16 per unit in Capital Outlay. However, nonresident students who attended high school in California for three or more years; graduated from a California high school or attained the equivalent (e.g., passed the high school proficiency or GED exam); and are U.S. citizens, immigrant aliens, or never-documented aliens may be eligible for exemption from nonresident tuition. Such students should contact the Admissions Office for more information.

 

Instructional Materials Fee

Students enrolled in credit or noncredit courses and programs may be required to provide certain instructional and other materials including, but not limited to, textbooks, tools, equipment and clothing.

 

Refund Policy

A student who has paid fees and withdraws from all or part of his/her enrollment by the deadline date may request a refund. Refunds are not automatic. Refund requests must be submitted based on the deadlines published in the semester Schedule of Classes. A Refund Application is available at the Cashier’s Office, online or in the Schedule of Classes. The refund amount is determined by the date the class first meets and the date the class is officially recorded as dropped. A minimum service fee of $5.00 (or more in the case of out-of-state tuition) will be charged for processing each refund request. Detailed information regarding the refund policy and procedure is available at the Cashier’s Office, room L113. Please call (626) 585-7085 for further information.


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* To the best of our knowledge, this information matches the printed catalog. The printed catalog is the authoritative source.