Pasadena City College, Home of the PCC Lancers

Chicago Style - Author-Date system

Below are some common examples of sources cited in the Chicago style author-date system:

Book-One author

In-text citation:

(Doniger 1999, 65)

Reference-list entry:

Doniger, Wendy. 1999. Splitting the difference. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Book-Two authors

In-text citation:

(Cowlishaw and Dunbar 2000, 104-7)

Reference-list entry:

Cowlishaw, Guy, and Robin Dunbar. 2000. Primate conservation biology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Book-Four or more authors

In-text citation:

(Laumann et al. 1994, 262)

Reference-list entry:

Laumann, Edward O., John H. Gagnon, Robert T. Michael, and Stuart Michaels. 1994. The social organization of sexuality: Sexual practices in the United States. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Book-Editor, translator, or compiler instead of author

In-text citation:

(Lattimore 1951, 91-92)

Reference-list entry:

Lattimore, Richmond, trans. 1951. The Iliad of Homer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Article in a print journal

In-text citation:

(Smith 1998, 639)

Reference-list entry:

Smith, John Maynard. 1998. The origin of altruism. Nature 393: 639-40.

Article in an online journal

If an access date is required by your publisher or discipline, include it parenthetically at the end of the citation, as in the fourth example below.

In-text citation:

(Hlatky et al. 2002)

Reference-list entry:

Hlatky, Mark A., Derek Boothroyd, Eric Vittinghoff, Penny Sharp, and Mary A. Whooley. 2002. Quality-of-life and depressive symptoms in postmenopausal women after receiving hormone therapy: Results from the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) trial. Journal of the American Medical Association 287, no. 5 (February 6), http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v287n5/rfull/joc10108.html#aainfo (accessed January 7, 2004).

Popular magazine article

In-text citation:

(Martin 2002, 84)

Reference-list entry:

Martin, Steve. 2002. Sports-interview shocker. New Yorker, May 6.

Newspaper article

Newspaper articles may be cited in running text (“As William Niederkorn noted in a New York Times article on June 20, 2002, . . . ”) instead of in a note or an in-text citation, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography or reference list as well. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations.

In-text citation:

(Niederkorn 2002)

Reference-list entry:

Niederkorn, William S. 2002. A scholar recants on his “Shakespeare” discovery. New York Times, June 20, Arts section, Midwest edition.

Web site

Web sites may be cited in running text (“On its Web site, the Evanston Public Library Board of Trustees states . . .”) instead of in an in-text citation, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography or reference list as well. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations. If an access date is required by your publisher or discipline, include it parenthetically at the end of the citation, as in the second example below.

In-text citation:

(Evanston Public Library Board of Trustees)

Reference-list entry:

Evanston Public Library Board of Trustees. Evanston Public Library strategic plan, 2000–2010: A decade of outreach. Evanston Public Library. http://www.epl.org/library/strategic-plan-00.html.

Weblog entry or comment

Weblog entries or comments may be cited in running text (“In a comment posted to the Becker-Posner Blog on March 6, 2006, Peter Pearson noted . . .”) instead of in a note or an in-text citation, and they are commonly omitted from a bibliography or reference list as well. The following examples show the more formal versions of the citations. If an access date is required by your publisher or discipline, include it parenthetically at the end of the citation, as in the first example below.

In-text citation:

(Peter Pearson, The Becker-Posner Blog, comment posted March 6, 2006)

Reference-list entry:

Becker-Posner blog, The. http://www.becker-posner-blog.com/.

 

E-mail message

E-mail messages may be cited within the text (“In an e-mail message to the author on October 31, 2005, John Doe revealed . . .”) instead of in a note or an in-text citation, and they are rarely listed in a bibliography or reference list. The following example shows the more formal version of a note.

Note: 2. John Doe, e-mail message to author, October 31, 2005.

 

Item in online database

Journal articles published in online databases should be cited as shown above, under “Article in an online journal.” If an access date is required by your publisher or discipline, include it parenthetically at the end of the citation, as in the first example below.

In-text citation:

(Pliny the Elder, Perseus Digital Library)

Reference-list entry:

Perseus Digital Library. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/.

 

***All examples taken from http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html