The Division of Institutional Equity, Diversity and Justice plans, leads and implements, in collaboration with College partners, institutional initiatives to advance diversity, equity and inclusion throughout all areas of Pasadena City College. Realizing our commitment to creating an anti-racist and anti-colonial institution, we work collaboratively with students, staff and faculty to lead change in dismantling systemic racism consistent with the values of PCC.

Our Priorities

  1. Lead organizational change toward advancing diversity, equity and inclusion goals;
  2. Build coalitions to develop and advance strategic priorities;
  3. Facilitate organizational learning at individual, team and systems levels;
  4. Respond with care and empathy  to communities in conflict and crisis.

Leadership Development Embedding equity in the policies and processes of Pasadena City College.
Bias Response Responding to hate and bias-related incidents.

Equity in Action

Supporting the creation of an inclsuive, equitable community for students, faculty, and staff.

Events & Programs

 

Equity Anchors Program
Equity Anchors Program Learn more about the professional learning series taking place this fall.
 
 

Event Resources

Pasadena City College is a learning community within the indigenous homelands of people who have been known as the Gabrielieño Band of Mission Indians of the Sisitcanongna [pronounced "Shesh-i-i-kuan-ga") Village and Kizh Nation. Tonight we acknowledge the painful history of genocide and forced removal from this land on which we gather.

We also honor the legacy of the African diaspora and recognize that the United States as we know it was built at the often-fatal expense of forcefully enslaved Black people. We are indebted to their labor and the labor of many Black and Brown bodies that continue to work in the shadows for our collective benefit.

PCC and its faculty, staff, and students recognize that we are all simultaneously teachers, learners, and guests on these lands. This acknowledgment is a small part of an ongoing process of working to raise awareness about histories that are too often erased or forgotten, to recognize our place in this history, and to affirm our commitment to social justice, systemic change, and anti-racism.

We recognize that the United States as we know it was built at the often-fatal expense of forcefully enslaved Black people. We must acknowledge that much of what we know of this country today, including its culture, economic growth, and development has been made possible by the labor of enslaved Africans and their descendants who suffered the horror of the transatlantic trafficking, chattel slavery, and, later on, dehumanization through segregation and Jim Crow laws.

We acknowledge and remember those who did not survive the Middle Passage, those who were beaten and lynched as a result of White Supremacy, and those who are still suffering while fighting for their freedom. We are indebted to their labor and their unwilling sacrifice, and we must acknowledge the tremors of that violence throughout the generations and the resulting impact and generational trauma is still felt and witnessed today.

Today, we are indebted to their labor and the labor of many Black and Brown bodies that continue to work in the shadows for our collective benefit.